Urban Development Institute of Australia
Western Australia Division Incorporated
Members Login

Public transport the key to a modern city 08/08/2015

Peter Newman, one of the leaders in the public transport debate, recently wrote an article in which he said: “Congestion trends being used to us are not based on actual data but on projections. They come from a model that is now discredited. In reality, Australian cities peaked in car use per person in 2004, like all developed cities across the globe.”

Peter Newman, one of the leaders in the public transport debate, recently wrote an article in which he said: “Congestion trends being used to us are not based on actual data but on projections. They come from a model that is now discredited. In reality, Australian cities peaked in car use per person in 2004, like all developed cities across the globe.”


Professor Newman goes on to say: “Rail patronage is booming way beyond prediction.” So it seems while there is a lot of rhetoric around Perth residents being firmly ensconced in their cars, the data paints a different picture.


Census data for 2011 in relation to ‘’car only journey to work” information shows Perth had the biggest reduction in car use of all major capital cities – down 2.6 per cent to 80.1 per cent. This was lower than Adelaide, Canberra and Hobart but higher than Sydney’s 67.7 per cent.


Since 2004, when the rail extension to Clarkson was opened, Perth has had a revolution in public transport, extending to the 2005 opening of Greenwood station, two underground stations in Perth and the Mandurah line in 2007.


Last year Butler station opened. This has catered for much of the latent demand along those routes with 60 percent of peak-hour trips to the CBD now made by public transport according to the Public Transport Authority.


Perth has the highest proportion of people driving to the train station, at 30 per cent. In Brisbane, 27 per cent of commuters drive to the train station and in Melbourne it is 21 percent. In Perth this is attributed to having the two major train lines in the middle of the freeway with reasonable distances between stations, thereby reducing the opportunity for walkable catchments. Transport-orientated developments, including Cockburn Central, Wellard and Clarkson, are delivering opportunities for those who want easy access to the train.


For example, 29 per cent of Clarkson commuters use public transport to get to work. Professor Newman says: ‘’The young and the wealthy are buying in locations where car dependence is minimised and where sustainable transport options are easily available. Freedom and connection is now based on smart phones and social media and these are easier to use where you can walk, cycle or use a bus and train.”


Transport-orientated developments are a great option and part of the broad range of lifestyles we need to accommodate people in a growing city regardless of whether they are wealthy or struggling, living alone or with friends and family. Getting the balance right is the big challenge.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Comments are moderated by an administrator before being published.

Comments

To leave a comment, use the above form. Comments are moderated by an administrator before being published. Your email address will not be published.

Return to archive

Related articles

Featured articles

Categories

Proudly supported by

  • Strategen
  • Rawlinsons
  • LD Total
  • Mirvac
  • Landgate
  • Landcorp
  • Stockland
  • QWest Paterson
  • Pindan
  • The West Australian

Subscribe

UDIA WA’s email newsletter provides you with recent news and events on the urban development industry. You are able to unsubscribe at any time.