Urban Development Institute of Australia
Western Australia Division Incorporated
Members Login

Missing middle housing 11/06/2016

There is no doubt that Perth has undergone major changes in the last decade or so and we continue to evolve into an increasingly vibrant city.

There is no doubt that Perth has undergone major changes in the last decade or so and we continue to evolve into an increasingly vibrant city.

The renaissance of Perth is in no small part due to the fact that our population is diversifying and people’s expectations about where they want to live are changing.

There are more singles and couples without children as well as older persons looking for appropriate housing that suits their needs in a context where they can socialise, work and access a range of amenity within close proximity of where they live.

The traditional single family home, while still very popular with many buyers, does not suit everyone.

Perth is not alone in terms of changing housing needs and it is with this in mind that California-based urban designer Daniel Parolek coined the term “Missing Middle Housing”.

Daniel describes missing middle housing as a range of multi-unit or clustered housing types compatible in scale with single family homes that help meet the growing demand for walkable urban living.

In basic terms, this type of housing provides a middle ground between higher density housing and low density single family homes.

Missing middle housing is made up of a range of housing types such as duplex, triplex and fourplex as well as townhouses and multiplex.

The housing is built in existing or newly created urban areas, so that residents are able to walk to services and amenities.

One of the benefits of middle housing is that it is catering to a growing section of the community who want to have ease of access to a range of amenity, while also achieving a smaller urban footprint than single family homes.

This type of housing often feels less dense, due to the mix of housing types, while still achieving the critical mass required to make services such as public transport, retail and other amenity sustainable.

The type of middle housing that Daniel Parolek is describing works very well for infill development where the scale and style of dwellings can blend with the existing housing.

We are certainly seeing ‘middle housing’ emerging in areas around Perth, however I think more can be done to better facilitate this type of development moving forward in order to cater for a growing demand for walkable urban communities in both existing and new areas.

If you would like to find out more about this topic, visit: www.missingmiddlehousing.com.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Comments are moderated by an administrator before being published.

Comments

To leave a comment, use the above form. Comments are moderated by an administrator before being published. Your email address will not be published.

Return to archive

Related articles

Featured articles

Categories

Proudly supported by

  • Strategen
  • Rawlinsons
  • LD Total
  • Mirvac
  • Landgate
  • Landcorp
  • Stockland
  • QWest Paterson
  • Pindan
  • The West Australian

Subscribe

UDIA WA’s email newsletter provides you with recent news and events on the urban development industry. You are able to unsubscribe at any time.